Japan Tours

A unique fusion of modern life and ancient traditions, Japan is the perfect holiday destination for those looking to zen-out, embrace different cultures, try new cuisines, and make unforgettable memories. Wander in the shade of blooming cherry blossoms as Himeji Castle. Come face to face with the Geishas of Kyoto. Meditate with Buddhist Monks in the mountains. Belt out your favourite karaoke tunes until the early hours of the morning in Shinjuku. Capture picture-perfect shots of Mt Fuiji in Hakone. Learn of Japan’s rich history and sufferings of war in Hiroshima. Travel at over 270 km per hour in Japan’s iconic bullet trains. Travel Talk Japan tours include 4- & 3-star accommodation, transfers, Japan Rail Passes and a private English-speaking guide. Plus, a range of incredible optional activities to shape your adventure to your taste! Don't forget to use the promo code GVMEXT5 at checkout to get your 5% extra discount, adding up to 50% off!
A unique fusion of modern life and ancient traditions, Japan is the perfect holiday destination for those looking to zen-out, embrace different cultures, try new cuisines, and make unforgettable memories.

Our Japan Trips

NEW TRIP

Trip Style: Classic, Short Break

Highlights of Japan

8 Days

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from

$3789

$2084

NEW TRIP

Trip Style: Classic, Discovery

Japan Explorer

10 Days

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from

$5249

$2887

NEW TRIP

Trip Style: Discovery, In-Depth Explorer

Ultimate Japan

14 Days

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from

$6269

$3448

Japan Accommodation

We accommodate our guests in below mentioned 4 & 3 Star hotels on our Japan trips. Hotels of similar standards may be used depending on availability.

WAT HOTEL
Takayama
4 Star

Guests can make use of the hot spring bath. An off-site fitness centre, 4-minutes away on foot, is available free of charge.The hotel is located 2km from Hida Minzoku Mura Folk Village.

SOTETSU FRESA
Hiroshima
4 Star

Located on Peace Boulevard and overlooking Peace Memorial Park and the Motoyasu River, this hotel right in the city center. It has 2 top-floor restaurants and a bar.

HEIANBO RYOKAN
Kyoto
Ryokan

Heianbo Ryokan is a 4-star hotel, only one km from Kamo River. This place is set in the centre of Kyoto. Guests can enjoy Japanese and Asian meals at Kyo Chabana Kyotoekimae

MT KOYA SHUKUBO MONASTERY
Mt Koya
Monastery - 3 Star Quality

The small mountaintop Buddhist community of Mount Koya is one of Japan’s most magical, increasingly popular, destinations and the perfect place to spend a night at a monastery.

WBF NAMBA KUROMON
Osaka
3 Star

You can enjoy a great view of Osaka downtown and Ikoma mountains from the restaurant located on the top floor of the hotel. Has a roof top bar located on the top floor of the hotel.

ICHINOYU SHINKAN
Hakone
Ryokan

Located in a quiet area, offers rooms with a private open-air hot-spring bath. Guests can use free Wi-Fi at the entire property and enjoy the public indoor,outdoor hot-spring baths as well.

SUNROUTE ASAKUSA
Tokyo
3 Star

Hotel Sunroute Asakusa is located near to the Tawaramachi metro station, The non-smoking rooms featuring earth-tone colours are equipped with an en suite bathroom, air conditioning/heating.

Japan Sights Map

Japan Travel Guide

March, April and May are the best months to visit in order to experience the spectacular cherry blossom views. October & November are also pleasant weather wise. Summers are hot and humid, and winters are very cold in the country but the best time to travel also depends on your travel plans as the country offers many interesting summer festivals & winter sports/ activities.
We closely monitor the latest travel updates to Japan and follow the advice of the UK Foreign Office. For the latest travel advice from UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO), please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/japan.
Passengers from Australia, New Zealand, UK, USA and Canada do not require a visa for short stays. All passports need to be valid for another 6 months from the day you leave Japan. Passport validity entry requirements change per nationality. This information is provided only as a guidance, we strongly advise that you check with the consulate or embassy as this information can change at any time and with little notice. It is your responsibility to make sure that all the required travel documents are ready when travelling.
Japan will likely be one of the most mesmerizing countries you’ll visit. It has a fascinating and multifaceted culture; on the one hand it is steeped in the deepest of traditions dating back thousands of years, on the other it is a society in a continual state of rapid flux, with continually shifting fads and fashions and technological development that constantly pushes back the boundaries of the possible. This is part of what makes it such a fascinating country to visit. If you are looking for something different you are sure to find it here! Japan is very well-known with its World Heritage Sites. Whether it’s the serenity of Mt. Fuji or the historic monuments of ancient Kyoto, the 15 cultural and 4 natural UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout Japan are a great starting point. Japanese festivals, or matsuri, are a very important part of the Japanese cultural calendar. Some matsuri date back almost a thousand years, and months and months of preparation and hard work go into making them a success. Many Japanese drinks and dishes have become staples of international cuisine, which makes Japan a paradise of plenty for the seasoned foodie. The country, on the other hand, has some of the biggest electronics conglomerates in the World, some of the most cutting-edge innovations and has more Nobel laureates in science than any other Asian country. Japanese culture is also intertwined with sport, whether it be kendo and kyudo, originally developed for hunting and combat, judo, a combat sport with the philosophical aim of perfecting one’s character or the must-see cultural sport experience, sumo, the ancient Shinto ritual that has represented Japan as a national sport for centuries.
Japanese cuisine offers an abundance of gastronomical delights with a boundless variety of regional and seasonal dishes. Restaurants in Japan range from mobile food stands to centuries old ryotei, atmospheric drinking places, seasonally erected terraces over rivers, cheap chain shops and unique theme restaurants about ninja and robots. Many restaurants are specialized in a single type of dish, while others offer a variety of dishes. Japan is divided into distinct geographic regions, each of which has developed its own unique culinary traditions. As a result travellers can encounter a diverse set of regional foods as they move from area to area. In December 2013 Washoku, the traditional cuisine of Japan was recognized as an Intangible Cultural Heritage asset by UNESCO. Tokyo is thereby the unofficial culinary capital of the world, beating all other cities in terms of the number of Michelin star restaurants (currently 14 with top star rating).
Japan is a shopping paradise with a wealth of stores selling everything from traditional souvenirs and local food to the latest electronics and hottest fashion brands. Both domestic and foreign brands are represented, as are stores for all budgets, from the 100 yen shops to high-end fashion boutiques and department stores. The top 10 best places for shopping in Japan are Harajuku, Shibuya, Shinsaibashi shopping street, Minato mirai, Canal city Hakata, Umeda, Omotesando, Tenjin underground shopping street, Sannomiya centre street and Ginza. Surprisingly, you can find high-quality souvenirs at reasonable prices at the airport. Expect to find t-shirts, key chains, yukatas, dolls, pottery, sweets, and other Japanese goods in the shopping areas before going through immigration.
Yuki Matsuri: Yuki Matsuri, also known as “Sapporo snow festival”, is held for about a week in Hokkaido. This festivity is one of Japan’s most popular winter events, starting out in 1950 when a group of high-school students built snow statues in the local park. It has since developed into a huge, cultural event featuring snow and ice sculptures which people compete in by making their own, it attracts more than two million visitors from Japan and across the world every year. Omizutori: The Omizutori festival, also known as the “sacred water-drawing” festival, takes place over 2 weeks in March, in the city of Nara. The Buddhist festival is a ceremony to cleanse people of their sins and bring spring to the new year; once the festival is over the cherry blossom season blooms. There are many different events that happen during this festival – but the most famous is Otaminatsu.   Gion Matsuri: this is known as the mother of all Japanese celebrations. This festival began as part of a purification ritual to appease the gods thought to cause fire, floods and earthquakes. The event itself is so popular, that it gets celebrated for the whole month of July with something different happening nearly every day. It’s a huge event in Kyoto culture and loved by locals and tourists alike, with the favourite events held on 17th and 24th July. For visitors, the most enjoyable part of the festival is the “Yoi-yama” events held on the three evenings preceding the main float processions. If you can lay your hands on a yukata, why not get dressed up and enjoy the fun?   Aomori Nebuta Matsuri: Japan’s most colourful festival takes place in August, featuring stunning floats shaped as mythological creatures and famous Japanese characters. Nebuta refers to the float of a brave warrior-figure which gets carried through the centre of the city. The festival uses these creature-inspired floats that replicate armies in the 800’s to scare away the enemy. The floats are normally made from cotton, cloth and bamboo. The highlight of the festival is the daily parade of enormous lantern floats, surrounded by large drums, musicians and dancers. As a tourist, you can enjoy the food, soak up the live music, cultural dances and the mesmerising light-up floats.   Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri: The Danjiri Matsuri is essentially a harvest festival to pray for a good autumn bounty! It takes place in Kishiwada, South Osaka, is a fun, powerful celebration and the most famous danjiri matsuri in Japan. A danjiri is a traditional Japanese wooden float decorated with carvings and lots of ornaments. The wooden floats are made in the shape of a shrine or temple and are pulled through the streets on festival days. Today, the festival is considered to be Osaka’s wildest party, that’s celebrated in mid-September. The majority of the floats weigh over 3000 kg and are pulled by an enthusiastic team of up to 1,000 people. All the floats represent a different district of the city with each districts pride being at stake as each team is competing for the victory.

Japan Tours - FAQ

Passengers from Australia, New Zealand, UK, USA and Canada do not require a visa for short stays up to 90 days. We recommend to have a passport with at least 6 months' validity remaining from months from the day you leave Japan. This information is provided only as a guidance, we strongly advise that you check with the consulate or embassy as this information can change at any time and with little notice. It is your responsibility to make sure that all the required travel documents are ready when travelling.
Yes, all passengers travelling with Travel Talk must have travel insurance before participating in any of our tours. Your guide will collect your travel insurance details on the first day of your trip. It is your responsibility to make sure you have an adequate and suitable travel insurance in place. You may read more about this here.
March, April and May are the best months to visit in order to experience the spectacular cherry blossom views. October & November are also pleasant weather wise. Summers are hot and humid, and winters are very cold in the country but the best time to travel also depends on your travel plans as the country offers many interesting summer festivals & winter sports/ activities.
Tap water in Japan is safe to drink according to international water quality standards. Consider using a reusable water bottle, especially if you are on a longer trip, reduce the use of plastic bottles.
The currency in Japan is the Japanese Yen. A few examples of approximate prices (100 YEN = $1): A can of Coke: 120 Yen Pizza: 1000 – 2000 Yen Burger set meal: 700-1000 Yen Sushi Meal: 2000-8000 Yen Sandwich: 300 – 500 Yen Beer: 400 – 1000 Yen
Most of the mobile phones are compatible so you will not experience any issues using your mobile device but roaming charges can be quite expensive, so it may be a good idea to buy a local data card instead of using your sim card while in Japan.
Wi-Fi is available in most of the hotels & restaurants/ cafes and is, in general, free of charge.
It is recommended to have some cash with you when visiting rural areas and for entrance fees. In major cities, credit cards are widely accepted
ATMs are commonly available in most towns of Japan.
Solo travellers often join our tours to meet and travel with like-minded adventurers, forming longstanding friendships. We also strive to provide a relaxed and sociable tour experience to allow the group to weld throughout the journey. Solo travellers will be roomed with another solo traveller of the same gender, or can upgrade to a solo room by paying the single supplement.
There are always solo travelers on our tours. If you don’t mind being roomed with another single traveler of the same gender, you do not need to pay the supplement. Single supplement is for travelers who would like to stay in a single room for the duration of their tour.
Please contact us with your request & we will do our best to arrange your room accordingly. info@traveltalktours.com 0208 099 9596
Our tours do not include airfare to/from the destination, and we do not advise on ticket, or sell flights. It is your responsibility to make it to the starting point of your tour on time.
If you provide your dietary requirements at the time of booking, we will do our best to make the necessary arrangements where available. You can leave a comment under the "Notes" section when making an online booking or simply contact us. Please note that gluten-free & vegan options can be limited.
Good news, there is not any luggage restriction on our tours as long as you’re able to carry your own luggage - usually just for a very short distance.
There is no tipping culture in Japan and this action can be taken as an insult so try to avoid it while you are there!

Recent Travel Articles On Japan

Top 7 Things To Do in Kyoto

From cherry blossoms, Geishas, bamboo forests, tasty bowls of ramen and over 2,000 temples and shrines, Kyoto is one of those magical cities quite unlike nowhere else. As the imperial capital of Japan for over ...

TRAVEL GUIDE
Best time to visit
March, April and May are the best months to visit in order to experience the spectacular cherry blossom views. October & November are also pleasant weather wise. Summers are hot and humid, and winters are very cold in the country but the best time to travel also depends on your travel plans as the country offers many interesting summer festivals & winter sports/ activities.
TRAVEL GUIDE
Travel Advice
We closely monitor the latest travel updates to Japan and follow the advice of the UK Foreign Office. For the latest travel advice from UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO), please visit: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/japan.
TRAVEL GUIDE
Visas
Passengers from Australia, New Zealand, UK, USA and Canada do not require a visa for short stays. All passports need to be valid for another 6 months from the day you leave Japan. Passport validity entry requirements change per nationality. This information is provided only as a guidance, we strongly advise that you check with the consulate or embassy as this information can change at any time and with little notice. It is your responsibility to make sure that all the required travel documents are ready when travelling.
TRAVEL GUIDE
Culture
Japan will likely be one of the most mesmerizing countries you’ll visit. It has a fascinating and multifaceted culture; on the one hand it is steeped in the deepest of traditions dating back thousands of years, on the other it is a society in a continual state of rapid flux, with continually shifting fads and fashions and technological development that constantly pushes back the boundaries of the possible. This is part of what makes it such a fascinating country to visit. If you are looking for something different you are sure to find it here! Japan is very well-known with its World Heritage Sites. Whether it’s the serenity of Mt. Fuji or the historic monuments of ancient Kyoto, the 15 cultural and 4 natural UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout Japan are a great starting point. Japanese festivals, or matsuri, are a very important part of the Japanese cultural calendar. Some matsuri date back almost a thousand years, and months and months of preparation and hard work go into making them a success. Many Japanese drinks and dishes have become staples of international cuisine, which makes Japan a paradise of plenty for the seasoned foodie. The country, on the other hand, has some of the biggest electronics conglomerates in the World, some of the most cutting-edge innovations and has more Nobel laureates in science than any other Asian country. Japanese culture is also intertwined with sport, whether it be kendo and kyudo, originally developed for hunting and combat, judo, a combat sport with the philosophical aim of perfecting one’s character or the must-see cultural sport experience, sumo, the ancient Shinto ritual that has represented Japan as a national sport for centuries.
TRAVEL GUIDE
Eating & Drinking
Japanese cuisine offers an abundance of gastronomical delights with a boundless variety of regional and seasonal dishes. Restaurants in Japan range from mobile food stands to centuries old ryotei, atmospheric drinking places, seasonally erected terraces over rivers, cheap chain shops and unique theme restaurants about ninja and robots. Many restaurants are specialized in a single type of dish, while others offer a variety of dishes. Japan is divided into distinct geographic regions, each of which has developed its own unique culinary traditions. As a result travellers can encounter a diverse set of regional foods as they move from area to area. In December 2013 Washoku, the traditional cuisine of Japan was recognized as an Intangible Cultural Heritage asset by UNESCO. Tokyo is thereby the unofficial culinary capital of the world, beating all other cities in terms of the number of Michelin star restaurants (currently 14 with top star rating).
TRAVEL GUIDE
Shopping
Japan is a shopping paradise with a wealth of stores selling everything from traditional souvenirs and local food to the latest electronics and hottest fashion brands. Both domestic and foreign brands are represented, as are stores for all budgets, from the 100 yen shops to high-end fashion boutiques and department stores. The top 10 best places for shopping in Japan are Harajuku, Shibuya, Shinsaibashi shopping street, Minato mirai, Canal city Hakata, Umeda, Omotesando, Tenjin underground shopping street, Sannomiya centre street and Ginza. Surprisingly, you can find high-quality souvenirs at reasonable prices at the airport. Expect to find t-shirts, key chains, yukatas, dolls, pottery, sweets, and other Japanese goods in the shopping areas before going through immigration.
TRAVEL GUIDE
Festivals & Events
Yuki Matsuri: Yuki Matsuri, also known as “Sapporo snow festival”, is held for about a week in Hokkaido. This festivity is one of Japan’s most popular winter events, starting out in 1950 when a group of high-school students built snow statues in the local park. It has since developed into a huge, cultural event featuring snow and ice sculptures which people compete in by making their own, it attracts more than two million visitors from Japan and across the world every year. Omizutori: The Omizutori festival, also known as the “sacred water-drawing” festival, takes place over 2 weeks in March, in the city of Nara. The Buddhist festival is a ceremony to cleanse people of their sins and bring spring to the new year; once the festival is over the cherry blossom season blooms. There are many different events that happen during this festival – but the most famous is Otaminatsu.   Gion Matsuri: this is known as the mother of all Japanese celebrations. This festival began as part of a purification ritual to appease the gods thought to cause fire, floods and earthquakes. The event itself is so popular, that it gets celebrated for the whole month of July with something different happening nearly every day. It’s a huge event in Kyoto culture and loved by locals and tourists alike, with the favourite events held on 17th and 24th July. For visitors, the most enjoyable part of the festival is the “Yoi-yama” events held on the three evenings preceding the main float processions. If you can lay your hands on a yukata, why not get dressed up and enjoy the fun?   Aomori Nebuta Matsuri: Japan’s most colourful festival takes place in August, featuring stunning floats shaped as mythological creatures and famous Japanese characters. Nebuta refers to the float of a brave warrior-figure which gets carried through the centre of the city. The festival uses these creature-inspired floats that replicate armies in the 800’s to scare away the enemy. The floats are normally made from cotton, cloth and bamboo. The highlight of the festival is the daily parade of enormous lantern floats, surrounded by large drums, musicians and dancers. As a tourist, you can enjoy the food, soak up the live music, cultural dances and the mesmerising light-up floats.   Kishiwada Danjiri Matsuri: The Danjiri Matsuri is essentially a harvest festival to pray for a good autumn bounty! It takes place in Kishiwada, South Osaka, is a fun, powerful celebration and the most famous danjiri matsuri in Japan. A danjiri is a traditional Japanese wooden float decorated with carvings and lots of ornaments. The wooden floats are made in the shape of a shrine or temple and are pulled through the streets on festival days. Today, the festival is considered to be Osaka’s wildest party, that’s celebrated in mid-September. The majority of the floats weigh over 3000 kg and are pulled by an enthusiastic team of up to 1,000 people. All the floats represent a different district of the city with each districts pride being at stake as each team is competing for the victory.
HIGHLIGHTS
Tokyo
Japan’s busy capital, mixes the ultramodern and the traditional, from neon-lit skyscrapers to historic temples.The Imperial Palace sits amid large public gardens.
HIGHLIGHTS
Hakone
Hakone, in Japan's Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park west of Tokyo, is a mountainous town known for its hot springs resorts (onsen) and views of the iconic volcano Mount Fuji.
HIGHLIGHTS
Takayama
Takayama is a city in Japan's mountainous Gifu Prefecture. The narrow streets of its Sanmachi Suji historic district are lined with wooden merchants’ houses.
HIGHLIGHTS
Hiroshima
A modern city on Honshu Island, was largely destroyed by an atomic bomb during World War II. Today, Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park commemorates the 1945 event.
HIGHLIGHTS
Kyoto
Once the capital of Japan, is a city on the island of Honshu. It's famous for its numerous classical Buddhist temples, as well as gardens, imperial palaces
HIGHLIGHTS
Mount Koya
A large temple settlement in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan to the south of Osaka. In the strictest sense, Mount Kōya is the mountain name of Kongōbu-ji Temple
HIGHLIGHTS
Osaka
Osaka is a large port city and commercial center on the Japanese island of Honshu. It's known for its modern architecture, nightlife and hearty street food.
HIGHLIGHTS
Osaka Castle
The castle is one of Japan's most famous landmarks and it played a major role in the unification of Japan during the sixteenth century of the Azuchi-Momoyama period.
HIGHLIGHTS
Peace Museum
This museum is dedicated to documenting the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in World War II. The museum was established in August 1955 with the Peace Memorial Hall.
HIGHLIGHTS
Peace Park & A-Bomb Dome
The Hiroshima Peace Memorial, originally the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, and now commonly called the Genbaku Dome.
HIGHLIGHTS
Miyajima island
A small island in Hiroshima Bay, It is known for its forests and ancient temples. Just offshore, the giant, orange Great Torii Gate is partially submerged at high tide.
HIGHLIGHTS
Himeji Castle
Himeji Castle is a hilltop Japanese castle complex situated in the city of Himeji which is located in the Hyōgo Prefecture of Japan. It's an increasingly popular spot.
HIGHLIGHTS
Garan Sacred Area
The two most prominent buildings of the Garan are the Kondo Hall and the huge Konpon Daito Pagoda. The Hall is a large wooden temple hall where major ceremonies are held.
HIGHLIGHTS
Okunoin Cemetery
Old cedars tower in this sacred area with the mausoleum of Kobo Daishi, founder of Shingon Buddhism.This is an important site for the Japanese culture.
HIGHLIGHTS
Kuromon Market
Spacious market with vendors selling street food, fresh produce & shellfish, plus souvenirs. An amazing place to spend splendid times in peaceful area where full of locals.
ACCOMMODATION
Takayama
WAT HOTEL
4 Star
ACCOMMODATION
Hiroshima
SOTETSU FRESA
4 Star
ACCOMMODATION
Kyoto
HEIANBO RYOKAN
4 Star
ACCOMMODATION
Mt Koya
MT KOYA SHUKUBO MONASTERY
Star
ACCOMMODATION
Osaka
WBF NAMBA KUROMON
3 Star
ACCOMMODATION
Hakone
ICHINOYU SHINKAN
3 Star
ACCOMMODATION
Tokyo
SUNROUTE ASAKUSA
3 Star
F.A.Q.
Do I need a visa to enter Japan?
Passengers from Australia, New Zealand, UK, USA and Canada do not require a visa for short stays up to 90 days. We recommend to have a passport with at least 6 months' validity remaining from months from the day you leave Japan. This information is provided only as a guidance, we strongly advise that you check with the consulate or embassy as this information can change at any time and with little notice. It is your responsibility to make sure that all the required travel documents are ready when travelling.
F.A.Q.
Do I need to purchase travel insurance before travelling to Japan?
Yes, all passengers travelling with Travel Talk must have travel insurance before participating in any of our tours. Your guide will collect your travel insurance details on the first day of your trip. It is your responsibility to make sure you have an adequate and suitable travel insurance in place. You may read more about this here.
F.A.Q.
When is the best time to visit Japan?
March, April and May are the best months to visit in order to experience the spectacular cherry blossom views. October & November are also pleasant weather wise. Summers are hot and humid, and winters are very cold in the country but the best time to travel also depends on your travel plans as the country offers many interesting summer festivals & winter sports/ activities.
F.A.Q.
Can I drink tap water in Japan?
Tap water in Japan is safe to drink according to international water quality standards. Consider using a reusable water bottle, especially if you are on a longer trip, reduce the use of plastic bottles.
F.A.Q.
How much does it cost for a…?
The currency in Japan is the Japanese Yen. A few examples of approximate prices (100 YEN = $1): A can of Coke: 120 Yen Pizza: 1000 – 2000 Yen Burger set meal: 700-1000 Yen Sushi Meal: 2000-8000 Yen Sandwich: 300 – 500 Yen Beer: 400 – 1000 Yen
F.A.Q.
Can I use my mobile/ sim card while in Japan?
Most of the mobile phones are compatible so you will not experience any issues using your mobile device but roaming charges can be quite expensive, so it may be a good idea to buy a local data card instead of using your sim card while in Japan.
F.A.Q.
Is free Wi-Fi available in Japan?
Wi-Fi is available in most of the hotels & restaurants/ cafes and is, in general, free of charge.
F.A.Q.
Are credit cards widely accepted in Japan?
It is recommended to have some cash with you when visiting rural areas and for entrance fees. In major cities, credit cards are widely accepted
F.A.Q.
What is ATM access like in Japan?
ATMs are commonly available in most towns of Japan.
F.A.Q.
Do you have solo travelers on your tours?
Solo travellers often join our tours to meet and travel with like-minded adventurers, forming longstanding friendships. We also strive to provide a relaxed and sociable tour experience to allow the group to weld throughout the journey. Solo travellers will be roomed with another solo traveller of the same gender, or can upgrade to a solo room by paying the single supplement.
F.A.Q.
I am a solo passenger; do I need to pay single supplement?
There are always solo travelers on our tours. If you don’t mind being roomed with another single traveler of the same gender, you do not need to pay the supplement. Single supplement is for travelers who would like to stay in a single room for the duration of their tour.
F.A.Q.
Can I be roomed with my friends?
Please contact us with your request & we will do our best to arrange your room accordingly. info@traveltalktours.com 0208 099 9596
F.A.Q.
Do you arrange flights?
Our tours do not include airfare to/from the destination, and we do not advise on ticket, or sell flights. It is your responsibility to make it to the starting point of your tour on time.
F.A.Q.
Will my dietary requirements be catered for?
If you provide your dietary requirements at the time of booking, we will do our best to make the necessary arrangements where available. You can leave a comment under the "Notes" section when making an online booking or simply contact us. Please note that gluten-free & vegan options can be limited.
F.A.Q.
Is there any luggage restriction?
Good news, there is not any luggage restriction on our tours as long as you’re able to carry your own luggage - usually just for a very short distance.
F.A.Q.
Do I need to tip?
There is no tipping culture in Japan and this action can be taken as an insult so try to avoid it while you are there!
Articles
Top 7 Things To Do in Kyoto

Top 7 Things To Do in Kyoto

From cherry blossoms, Geishas, bamboo forests, tasty bowls of ramen and over 2,000 temples and shrines, Kyoto is one of those magical cities quite unlike nowhere else. As the imperial capital of Japan for over ...

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